Oklahoma Senate: Coburn (R) Continues To Far Outdistance Rogers (D)

Rasmussen Reports

Republican Senator Tom Coburn receives his highest level of support yet against Democratic challenger Jim Rogers in his bid for reelection in Oklahoma.

The latest Rasmussen Reports statewide telephone of Likely Voters shows Coburn picking up 68% of the vote, while Rogers, who has run for the seat twice previously, earns 26% support. Two percent (2%) prefer some other candidate, and four percent (4%) remain undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Oklahoma remains Solid GOP in the Rasmussen Reports Election 2010 Senate Balance of Power rankings.

Late last month, Coburn held a 67% to 24% lead over Rogers. In four surveys conducted since June, Coburn has earned between 65% and 68% support from voters. Rogers has picked up 24% to 31% of the vote during the same period.

One-in-three Oklahoma voters (34%) consider themselves a part of the Tea Party movement, which is much higher than results found on the national level. Fifty percent (50%) say they are not part of the movement, but another 16% are undecided.
Coburn is backed by 86% of Tea Party voters and 52% of non-Tea Party voters in Oklahoma.

This statewide telephone survey of 500 Likely Voters in Oklahoma was conducted on September 23, 2010 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/-4.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Republican Congresswoman Mary Fallin has jumped to a 26-point lead over Democrat Jari Askins in Okahoma’s gubernatorial race.

Coburn draws support from 91% of Republicans and 35% of Democrats. Rogers is backed by 55% of voters in his own party. Coburn also earns 81% support from voters not affiliated with either major political party.

Fifty-eight percent (58%) of all voters in the state say the Tea Party movement is good for the country, while just 21% see it as a bad thing.

Seventy percent (70%) of Oklahoma voters favor passage of an Arizona-like immigration law in their state, which is above the level of support found nationally. Twenty-one percent (21%) oppose passing such a law in their state.

Republican Senator Tom Coburn receives his highest level of support yet against Democratic challenger Jim Rogers in his bid for reelection in Oklahoma.

The latest Rasmussen Reports statewide telephone of Likely Voters shows Coburn picking up 68% of the vote, while Rogers, who has run for the seat twice previously, earns 26% support. Two percent (2%) prefer some other candidate, and four percent (4%) remain undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Oklahoma remains Solid GOP in the Rasmussen Reports Election 2010 Senate Balance of Power rankings.

Late last month, Coburn held a 67% to 24% lead over Rogers. In four surveys conducted since June, Coburn has earned between 65% and 68% support from voters. Rogers has picked up 24% to 31% of the vote during the same period.

One-in-three Oklahoma voters (34%) consider themselves a part of the Tea Party movement, which is much higher than results found on the national level. Fifty percent (50%) say they are not part of the movement, but another 16% are undecided.
Coburn is backed by 86% of Tea Party voters and 52% of non-Tea Party voters in Oklahoma.

This statewide telephone survey of 500 Likely Voters in Oklahoma was conducted on September 23, 2010 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/-4.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Republican Congresswoman Mary Fallin has jumped to a 26-point lead over Democrat Jari Askins in Okahoma’s gubernatorial race.

Coburn draws support from 91% of Republicans and 35% of Democrats. Rogers is backed by 55% of voters in his own party. Coburn also earns 81% support from voters not affiliated with either major political party.

Fifty-eight percent (58%) of all voters in the state say the Tea Party movement is good for the country, while just 21% see it as a bad thing.

Seventy percent (70%) of Oklahoma voters favor passage of an Arizona-like immigration law in their state, which is above the level of support found nationally. Twenty-one percent (21%) oppose passing such a law in their state.

To read more, visit:http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/elections/election_2010/election_2010_senate_elections/oklahoma/election_2010_oklahoma_senate

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